Category: Secure Internet

gchqThe Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ), the UK’s secretive signals intelligence agency, is developing ‘automated defence’ tools – already dubbed the ‘Great British Firewall’ – to help combat a spike in cyberattacks over the past year. The scheme, which is still in the early planning stages, would see major UK service providers working alongside GCHQ in a voluntary capacity to help filter malicious website domains that could potentially be used by hackers or state-sponsored rivals to infect computer systems. The main base for the operation is likely to be the agency’s upcoming National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC), set to launch later this year, which will bring together experts from MI5, Cert, local law enforcement and private industry to help fight the threat of hacking. “We know automated defences work on the internet,” Ciaran Martin, GCHQ’s director-general for cyber security, said during a conference in Washington DC on 13 September.

Read more at
http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/gchq-plans-great-british-firewall-protect-uk-against-hackers-1581299

email-is-not-privateThis “post-Sony attack” tweet from Olivia Nuzzi of The Daily Beast should have been framed and hung as motivational artwork on every office wall. Instead, a year and a half and numerous publicized email hacks later, it stands to remind us that people will continue to get caught with their pants down because they refuse to accept two simple certainties: Email is forever; and forever is a long time to keep anything truly secure. With more recent hacks on entities like the Democratic National Convention (DNC) and the State Department what’s particularly frustrating—beyond the hacks themselves, which are almost foregone conclusions in today’s connected world—is that people continue to send inappropriate emails. Why does it seem no one is learning from these blunders?

Read more at
http://www.securityweek.com/email-forever-and-its-not-private

EncryptionGoogle is boosting the security of its Gmail service in an effort to keep them protected from phishing attacks, malware, and other threats.

On Tuesday, the company announced that it would start informing users about potentially unsafe messages in their inbox, including emails that are not encrypted, Gerhard Eschelbeck, VP, Security and Privacy, Google, explains in a blog post. Additionally, Gmail will warn users when sending messages to recipients on email services that do not support TLS encryption. A warning will be displayed when the sender’s domain couldn’t be authenticated as well, the Internet giant explains. The warnings will appear in the form of a broken lock icon when sending or receiving a message to/from a service that doesn’t support TLS encryption, or as a question mark where a profile photo or logo should otherwise appear, when receiving a message that can’t be authenticated.

Read more at
http://www.securityweek.com/google-enhances-security-alerts-gmail

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The federal government will lean heavily on the private sector to help it deliver its long-awaited national cyber security policy and initiatives like voluntary infosec health checks for businesses and joint threat sharing centres in capital cities. iTnews can exclusively reveal the policy, which is expected to be released in the coming weeks, will contain five key pillars intended to help Australia grow by embracing disruptive technologies from a secure footing in all areas of the economy. The 46-page strategy, sighted by iTnews, is the first update to Australia’s national cyber security policy since 2009. Businesses and government agencies have been awaiting the updated document since late 2014, when then-PM Tony Abbott announced a review of the ageing strategy.

Read more at
http://www.itnews.com.au/news/revealed-australias-new-cyber-security-strategy-418000